Anne Nation and Fighting for What's Right

Our fandom has always been comprised of intelligent, vocal, passionate fans who came together to fight for something they loved - a show that has important stories to tell.

 

Please refer to our previous "demand" posts here and here that highlight diversity and inclusion within ANNE WITH AN E.  Many, many people from across the globe stated that they previously had zero insight or knowledge of how Indigenous peoples have been treated throughout Canadian history, or the existence of The Bog in PEI.  These storylines were eye-opening for many.

 

In January 2020, Anne Nation organized and funded billboards to garner media/network attention for the show we feel so strongly about. Most donations were very small, but the number of fans that donated propelled the project forward and we hope at the very least this exposed the show to new viewers around the world.

In February, Anne Nation spearheaded a charity merchandise project, planning to donate the majority of the proceeds to multiple charities (the remainder would go back to the artists themselves). Ultimately, the project had to fold due to copyright disputes from the ANNE WITH AN E production company. That said, Anne Nation would still like to spotlight several charities below that deserve attention.

 

Anne Nation encourages everyone who donated to the billboards, or any newer fans of the show who missed that time (and also missed the fandom-wide push to donate to the Australian fires), to consider donating to any of the charities or causes below and if they feel they need to do more, please get involved.

 

◦ Who are they?

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is a National Indigenous Organization representing the political voice of Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people in Canada, inclusive of First Nations on and off reserve, status and non-status, disenfranchised, Métis and Inuit.

 

An aggregate of Indigenous women’s organizations from across the country, NWAC was founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of Indigenous women within their respective communities and Canada societies. 

◦ What do they do?

NWAC works on a variety of issues such as employment, labour and business, health, violence prevention and safety, justice and human rights, environment, early learning childcare and international affairs. 

◦What can you do?

You can donate directly to the NWAC on their website. During the Covid-19 pandemic, indigenous families are getting hit hard. Donations will help these communities, including struggling women and children. Follow them on social media and keep up to date.

◦ Who are they?

A team of an international group of human rights lawyers, environmental activists, forestry specialists, environmental health scientists, filmmakers, journalists, anthropologists, and farmers.

 

◦What do they do?

Their mission statement is to support the struggles of indigenous peoples to defend their rights to land, life and cultural survival in the Amazon rainforest. They work side-by-side with indigenous people in an effort to provide them with access to necessities previously affected by the industrial industry.

 

They have cultural revival and women's empowerment programs as well as Indigenous rights, territorial mapping and environmental monitoring programs. We highly suggest taking a look at their website and learning more about this.

 

◦What can you do?

You can donate directly on their website.

◦ Who are they?

Girls for a Change has the mission of empowering young women by inviting them to design, lead, fund and implement social change projects that tackle issues girls face in their own neighborhoods.

 

◦What do they do?

They focus on the empowerment and uplifting of a population whose needs are most unmet—Black girls and other girls of color. Per their mission statement: 

 

 

"We, as an organization and movement, view this action as a first step to end the prejudice, poverty and lack of resources that leave Black girls and young women vulnerable at the margins of society.

 

Through GFAC programs, not only do girls create change by engaging in social change projects, but in the process, they learn problem-solving skills, as well as what it means to change policy and create movements. GFAC programs also focus on leadership skills, goal-planning, financial literacy, building a network, exposure, community engagement, skill-building, sisterhood building, and socio-emotional learning among other things. We also address various issues to include institutional racism, sexism, the digital divide, and the glass ceiling, which for many Black girls can be a concrete ceiling.

 

GFAC programs are designed to provide consistent support to girls, from their youth into their young adulthood, and beyond. We also provide outreach programs for middle and high school girls. Through experiential learning and consistent exposure, we focus on ensuring girls are ahead of the learning curve, breaking cycles and closing the opportunity gaps faced by too many disadvantaged, marginalized or underrepresented girls—specifically Black girls. We want to give every girl* who aspires to get ahead a chance to be seen, heard and celebrated."

 

◦What can you do?

If local, you can volunteer, be a coach, an ambassador or start a branch. Girlsforachange.org

◦ Who are they?

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led charitable organization that has existed for almost 20 years. Per their mission statement: The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and long-lasting intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System, Sixties Scoop, and other means of cultural oppression against Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities. Their mission is to educate towards creating just and equal relationships of reconciliation and healing for all Canadians, to expand awareness of and access to the rich legacy of the contributions of Indigenous Peoples in Canada and the world, and to make known the histories of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, including the histories of injustice.

◦What do they do?

Legacy of Hope works in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, supporting the development and implementation of educational and commemorative projects. Their mission is to educate and foster Reconciliation, specifically by teaching the history of Residential Schools and the injustices against Indigenous peoples.

 

◦What can you do?

Apart from educating yourselves on the Residential schools and treatment of indigenous communities throughout history, Legacy of Hope suggests getting actively involved by attending a local pow wow or visiting a friendship centre. Encourage those you know to learn, and spread the knowledge and information.

◦ Who are they?

Reclaim the Block organizes Minneapolis community and city council members to move money from the police department into other areas of the city’s budget that truly promote community health and safety.

 

◦What do they do?

They organize around policies that strengthen community-led safety initiatives and reduce reliance on police departments. They do not believe that increased regulation of or public engagement with the police will lead to safer communities, as community testimony and documented police conduct suggest otherwise.

 

Per their mission statement:

 

"As members of the Minneapolis community, we know that access to housing, youth services, harm reduction, and protections for low-wage workers help keep our communities more safe and more stable. For too long, our city has not prioritized the safety of our most marginalized community members: Black, indigenous, and people of color; immigrants; and LGBTQ community members. Instead, the city has continued to invest in policing, a system making the problem worse.

 

We stand with our neighbors and community organizations who are doing work on the ground to provide safety and services for our neighbors, who are often being told that "there's not enough money to go around." Minneapolis has continued to increase its police budget each year, without putting even a fraction of those resources toward solutions that really work. We deserve a city that funds the ways we take care of each other. We need a city that prioritizes ALL of us."

 

◦What can you do?

You can donate directly on their website, reclaimtheblock.org

◦ Who are they?

Mermaids is a UK-based charity that seeks to educate the wider public on gender identity. They focus by helping professionals accommodate gender-variant youth. It provides online communities for support, local community groups, helpline services, web resources and events.

 

◦What do they do?

Mermaids supports gender-diverse children and young people until their 20th birthdays, as well as their families. They aim to reduce isolation and loneliness for these youth, providing them with the tools and education they need to negotiate education and healthcare services. They help them cope better with mental and environmental distress, and equip parents with the tools they need for support.

 

◦What can you do?

If you live nearby you can volunteer and attend events, fundraisers, etc. 

◦ Who are they?

Indspire is a national Indigenous registered charity that invests in the education of Indigenous people for the long-term benefit of these individuals, their families and communities, and Canada.

 

◦What do they do?

Their mission is to enrich Canada through Indigenous education and by inspiring achievement. They partner with Indigenous, private and public sector stakeholders, motivated to educate, connect and invest in Indigenous people so they will achieve their highest potential. They serve First Nations, Inuit and Métis students in remote communities, rural areas and urban centres across Canada. They disburse financial awards and deliver programs, and share resources with the goal of increasing graduation rates for Indigenous students.

◦What can you do?

You can attend their events or join their Brighter Futures Circle, which is their nationwide Leadership Giving Program.

◦ Who are they?

Pflag Canada is a national charitable organization, founded by parents who wished to help themselves and their family members understand and accept their LGBTQ2S children.

◦What do they do?

Per their mission statement: 

 

"Pflag Canada is proud to be Canada’s only national organization that offers peer-to-peer support striving to help all Canadians with issues of sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. We support, educate and provide resources to anyone with questions or concerns. We promise to offer local, practical, and emotional peer-to-peer family support for individuals and their loved ones challenged by gender/sexual identity."

◦What can you do?

You can volunteer (they have provincial chapters) or become a member.

◦ Who are they?

The URHM is a non-profit based in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

 

◦What do they do?

They operate a food bank and soup kitchen, to meet some of the needs of local families and individuals. The rely solely on food and monetary donations, in order to provide food for those experiencing financial hardship and food insecurity. The Upper Room is a member of the Canadian Association of Food Banks, and organizes the distribution of food to other food banks and soup kitchens in the province through the PEI Food Banks.

 

◦What can you do?

You can become a URHM "Angel" and contribute weekly, or volunteer if you live in the area.

◦ Who are they?

Black Visions Collective (BLVC) believes in a future where all Black people have autonomy, safety is community-led, and we are in right relationship within our ecosystems.

◦What do they do?

Per mission statement:

 

"BLVC is committed to a long term vision in which ALL Black lives not only matter, but are able to thrive. What we know to be true in order to create this world is that oppressed people, especially Black people, need to build collective power in order to create systems transformation. Through the development of powerful strategic campaigns, we seek to expand the power of Black people across the Twin Cities metro area and Minnesota. This can look like delivering mobilization and action goals as part of a national coalition in which Black lives are centered, but it most often looks like visioning and leading targeted collaborative local campaigns that advance a concrete impact for people’s lives here, while also advancing a shift in public narrative that connects to transformative long-term change."

◦What can you do?

You can donate directly on their website, blackvisionsmn.org

◦ Who are they?

Campaign Zero are calling on local, state, and federal lawmakers to take immediate action to adopt data-driven policy solutions to end this violence and hold police accountable.

◦What do they do?

Campaign zero suggests tracking progress of legislation, demanding action from your local representatives and getting involved.  They strive to end broken windows policing, maintain community oversight, limit the use of force policies, independently investigate and prosecute, have community representation, advocate for body cams/the filming of police, proper training, end for-profit policing, demilitarization and strive for fair police union contracts.

◦What can you do?

We suggest taking a deep look at their website, joincampaignzero.org, as it holds a wealth of information.

Have a suggestion for a charity you think we should include here? Please let us know!  We want to know who Anne Nation feels we should focus on.   Send us an email!

© 2020 by ANNE NATION